Bush Rejects Senate's Iraq Timetable

The Senate, defying the threat of a presidential veto, approves $122 billion in war funds while setting a timeline for withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq. President Bush says U.S. military funding should be accomplished with no strings attached.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Even though some senators focused on U.S. attorneys, the Senate yesterday passed a $122 billion spending bill. It includes a timeline for withdrawing U.S. troops from Iraq. President Bush says he will veto any legislation that comes with too many strings attached and he called a meeting with Republicans at the White House.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: When we've got our troops in harm way, we expect that troop to be fully funded. And we've got commanders making tough decisions on the ground. We expect there to be no strings on our commanders.

INSKEEP: Now, the Senate bill must be reconciled with a similar House bill. If the president gets that bill and if he follows through on his veto threat, Democrats are not expected to have the votes to override that veto.

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