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Does The Military Wag Hollywood's Dog?

Movies

Does The Military Wag Hollywood's Dog?

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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The producers of Iron Man asked the U.S. Air Force for help in making their movie, and got it. That help meant access to bases and planes, as well as script advice. Another film, with a critical view of the war in Iraq, did not get the same privileges. Is the Pentagon trying to control the messages in Hollywood?

Julian Barnes, a Pentagon correspondent for the Los Angeles Times and author of the article The Iraq War Movie: Military Hopes to Shape Genre, speaks with Lt. Col. Todd Breasseale, Army liaison to Hollywood, and Christopher Orr, an online film critic for The New Republic, about the love-hate relationship between Hollywood and the military.

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