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How To Bake A Better Chocolate Chip Cookie

Food

How To Bake A Better Chocolate Chip Cookie

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Chocolate chip cookies, fresh from the oven, cool on a rack. YinYang/iStockphoto hide caption

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YinYang/iStockphoto

The invention of chocolate chip cookies is often credited to housewife Ruth Wakefield who, with her husband, ran the Tollhouse Inn in Massachusetts. The common story goes that Wakefield, who often made food for her guests, decided to make a chocolate butter cookie but didn't have enough chocolate bars to produce one — instead, she chopped up the bars and added them to the butter cookie recipe.

But can the recipe be improved upon? Shirley Corriher, a food scientist and author of Cookwise and the soon-to-be-released Bakewise, explains how to build a better chocolate chip cookie.