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Researchers Find Possible Genetic Clue To ADHD

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Researchers Find Possible Genetic Clue To ADHD

Children's Health

Researchers Find Possible Genetic Clue To ADHD

Researchers Find Possible Genetic Clue To ADHD

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92455272/92455266" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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This week in the Journal of Neuroscience, scientists report that in two brothers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, a genetic change appears to make one of the brain's neurochemical pathways — the dopamine transporter — run in reverse. The result of that miswiring is that the brain acts as if amphetamines are always present, the researchers say.

Randy Blakely, one of the study's authors, and Allan D. Bass, professor of pharmacology and psychiatry at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, talk about the findings and what they might mean for ADHD treatment.

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