Obama And The Chicago Establishment Barack Obama has been portrayed as an outsider candidate — an idealist not mired in the political game. But Ryan Lizza says that a look at Obama's political history in Chicago might offer a different view of the candidate. Lizza is the Washington correspondent for The New Yorker, and has been tracking the Obama campaign.
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Obama And The Chicago Establishment

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Obama And The Chicago Establishment

Obama And The Chicago Establishment

Obama And The Chicago Establishment

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92470268/92516124" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Barack Obama served in the Illinois state legislature from 1997 until 2004. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Barack Obama served in the Illinois state legislature from 1997 until 2004.

Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Though presidential candidate Barack Obama's campaign has been extensively covered by the media, little has been said about his roots in Chicago politics. Ryan Lizza, Washington correspondent for The New Yorker, explores Obama's tenure as a local politician for Chicago's South Side in the magazine's latest issue.

Before joining The New Yorker, Lizza served as senior editor of The New Republic, where he covered White House politics from 1998 to 2007.

Lizza has also covered politics for The New York Times, Atlantic Monthly, Washington Monthly and GQ.