NPR logo

Top Of The News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92510165/92510138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Top Of The News

Top Of The News

Top Of The News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92510165/92510138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The latest headlines.

MIKE PESCA, host:

How are you feeling? Welcome back to the Bryant Park Project from NPR News. We're on digital FM, Sirius Satellite Radio, online at npr.org/bryantpark. I'm Mike Pesca. Coming up, sports with our very own Bill Wolff. But first, let's continue this fiesta on over to the news booth where the BPP's Mark Garrison has the news.

BILL WOLFF: This is NPR.

(Soundbite of music)

MARK GARRISON: Thanks Mike. Genocide, it's the rare word that doesn't lose its power. Diplomats don't use it lightly. Sometimes, they're afraid to even say it, even in the face of a field of death. That's why today's news is a big deal. The International Criminal Court accuses Sudan's president of committing genocide. The ICC indicted Omar al Bashir. Charges include trying to wipe out Africans in Darfur with a campaign of murder and rape. The prosecutor wants an arrest warrant to prevent more deaths. There was concern the indictment might make things worse for refugees and peacekeeping troops. Sudan's government spokesman told Reuters they don't recognize the indictment, and they'll continue to work on the peace process while protecting U.N. workers in Sudan.

Ohio will be a hard-fought battleground for the presidential candidates. This week, they will both visit as the NAACP holds its convention in Cincinnati. NPR's Audie Cornish has more.

AUDIE CORNISH: Senator John McCain will address the convention later this week, while Senator Barack Obama is set to deliver his speech tonight. The event comes a week after derogatory, off-the-cuff comments by civil rights activist and former presidential candidate, Jesse Jackson, hit the airwaves. Jackson unwittingly sniped into an open microphone that Obama was speaking down to black people in some of the candidate's speeches. The dustup highlights the generational differences between the two politicians just as Obama goes before the nation's oldest civil rights organization. Jackson has since apologized, and two are likely to cross paths during the NAACP convention.

GARRISON: NPR's Audie Cornish reporting. McCain today will speak before Hispanic voters at the National Council of La Raza. He fought for an immigration bill popular with Latinos for its path to citizenship. Conservatives were furious, and the bill nearly sunk his campaign. As of late, he stressed border security over the citizenship part. Polls show Obama with a double-digit lead among Hispanics.

You can't appeal the laws of physics, and they can give as easily as take away. California firefighters got some of the rain they were hoping for, but that same rain triggered mudslides. They've damaged dozens of homes, and many burn zones got no rain. There are still nearly 300 fires around the state.

The Feds will bail out troubled mortgage-finance companies, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. That story sounds a little complicated, because it is, but it's also important to anyone who owns a home, wants to, or knows someone who does. That probably includes you. So, here's NPR's Jim Zarroli with more.

JIM ZARROLI: The announcement came after a rocky week in which investors fled the two companies, driving down their stock price and raising questions about their viability. Regulators spent the weekend searching for ways to prop up the companies and announced their plan early Sunday evening, just in time for the opening of the Asian stock markets. The Federal Reserve said it would allow the companies to borrow from its discount-lending window. Meanwhile, the Treasury Department said it would temporarily raise the companies' credit limits. It will also ask Congress for permission to buy shares of the companies when needed. The moves are designed to send a message that the companies have access to plenty of money and that investors shouldn't be afraid to buy their securities.

GARRISON: NPR's Jim Zarroli with that story, and that is the news for now. Plenty more online at npr.org.

WOLFF: This is NPR.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.