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BILL WOLFF: This is NPR.

(Soundbite of music)

MARK GARRISON: Thank you, Mike and Laura. In Iraq, a double suicide bombing at an army recruiting station. The blast killed at least 28, with dozens more wounded. The BBC's Jim Muir has more from Baghdad.

JIM MUIR: According to Iraqi army sources, the two suicide bombers wearing explosive vests mingled with crowds of young men gathering in the early morning at the recruiting center at the Assad army base near Baqubah. They then blew themselves up simultaneously, causing carnage among the would-be recruits. It's a tactic that's been used by Sunni-based insurgents many times in the past, often with deadly effect. Army and police forces and their recruiting centers have been targeted from the outset of the insurgency.

GARRISON: The BBC's Jim Muir reporting from Baghdad. For the first time, an interrogation at Guantanamo Bay is going public. Lawyers for a man held there released footage of interrogators questioning him. The man is accused of a 2002 grenade attack in Afghanistan.

Now, a story about McCain and Busch, but maybe not the ones you're thinking of, McCain, as in Cindy, wife of Republican presidential candidate, and Busch, as in Anheuser. Cindy McCain and her children own tens of thousands of shares in the brewer. They could make a pile of money off its sale. Here's NPR's Ted Robbins with more.

TED ROBBINS: Belgian brewer InBev announced it would buy Anheuser-Busch for 70 dollars a share, or 52 billion dollars. That's much higher than Anheuser-Busch's stock price earlier this year. McCain has never said how many shares she actually owns, but she reported earning 50 to 100,000 dollars in Anheuser-Busch dividends last year. At a buck and a quarter per share, do the math, and that adds up to between 2.8 and 5.6 million dollars at the takeover price. Cindy McCain chairs the third largest beer distributorship in the U.S., which she inherited from her father. The Arizona company distributes Anheuser-Busch products. She has said that she will deal with any potential conflicts of interest if and when her husband gets elected.

GARRISON: NPR's Ted Robbins reporting. Former pro-wrestler, Minnesota governor, Jesse Ventura, says he will stay out of the Minnesota Senate race. He did carve out a little exception though. Here's what he said on CNN last night.

(Soundbite of TV show "Larry King Live")

Former Governor JESSE VENTURA (Independent, Minnesota): If between now and five o'clock, maybe God comes and speaks to me like he did the president, and tells me I should run, like he apparently told the president to invade Iraq, well, then maybe at five o'clock tomorrow, Larry, don't call me a liar, just understand God sent me to file.

GARRISON: God willing, after the five p.m. filing deadline, the race pits Republican incumbent Senator, Norm Coleman, against satirist, Al Franken, the Democratic nominee. That is your news for now. Plenty more online at npr.org.

WOLFF: This is NPR.

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MIKE PESCA, host:

Ah. Mark, I sometimes feel that if people didn't interrupt Jesse Ventura, he would have started speaking at his inauguration for governor, you know, what, 13 years ago, and it wouldn't have stopped yet.

GARRISON: Who knows?

PESCA: (As Jesse Ventura) I've got to tell you something, mean Jean, mean Larry. I won't be running for Senate, but I'll be talking about all the issues. The figure-four leg lock versus the top turnbuckle, Larry.

GARRISON: (As Jesse Ventura) Belly-to-back suplex.

(Soundbite of laughter)

PESCA: Yes. I enjoy the suplex.

GARRISON: Supleces (ph), I think, is the plural.

PESCA: Yeah. Suplexium (ph), the - which is new from Pfizer. The good thing about him not entering the race is that as Norm Coleman faces off against Al Franken, Minnesota is having two New Yorkers run for their Senate seat, which is nice.

GARRISON: I didn't know that about Coleman. I knew that about Franken.

PESCA: Another fascinating fact about me, and my background, and the people I come from...

GARRISON: Your brain and our show, filled with them all the time.

PESCA: This is one of those instances where we know for sure, no matter what happens, the net number of Jews in the Senate will not decline, as both gentlemen are of Hebraic extraction. Isn't that fascinating? As are both senators from Wisconsin, Jewish. Crazy. All right. Stick around with the BPP. We have The Most coming up on just a bit. Also, Death Cab for Cutie, and New Music Tuesday. This is the Bryant Park Project from NPR News.

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