Black Conservatives Grapple With Pull Of Obama Conservative commentator Armstrong Williams talks about the state of blacks in the Republican Party. Williams says though Sen. John McCain made a good speech at the NAACP convention, the GOP presidential hopeful faces an uphill battle with black voters.
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Black Conservatives Grapple With Pull Of Obama

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Black Conservatives Grapple With Pull Of Obama

Black Conservatives Grapple With Pull Of Obama

Black Conservatives Grapple With Pull Of Obama

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Conservative commentator Armstrong Williams, who is African-American, says he's torn between voting for Republican John McCain and Democrat Barack Obama in the November presidential election.

"Many conservatives who happen to be black see it as a dilemma because they're wondering what they're going to tell their children and grandchildren 20 years from now when they had a chance in American history, which is rare and has never happened before, to pull the lever [for a black presidential candidate]," Williams tells host Michele Norris. "It creates quite a dilemma because there's not something wrong with Sen. John McCain; he's very impressive."

Williams notes that McCain is a war hero and has carved out a reputation as a maverick in the Senate who often bucks his own party.

"Yet," Williams says, "the tide of history doesn't necessarily favor him in this race."

Williams says many black conservatives will have a difficult time deciding who to vote for.

"It's going to be very difficult," he says, "for them to pull the lever against Sen. Barack Obama in this historical election."