After 36-Year Effort, Rare Tortoise Is Expecting

  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/92768470/92768458" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
  • Transcript

The rare Galapagos tortoise named Lonesome George was thought to be the last of his kind. But Lonesome may soon have a family of his own. George's companion from a similar species laid three eggs after 36 years of trying.

DEBORAH AMOS, host:

Good morning, I'm Deb Amos. The rare Galapagos tortoise named Lonesome George was thought to be the last of his kind, but Lonesome may soon have a family of his own. George's companion from a similar species laid three eggs. After 36 years of trying, George's human caretaker thought the tortoise couldn't reproduce. The eggs won't hatch for another four months, but George, if you're listening, everyone here is rooting for you. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.