Is Audience Out There For New 'X-Files' Movie?

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David Duchovy and Gillian Anderson in front of a stained-glass window i

X factor: The plot's still secret, but count on a reprise of the simmering sexual tension between agents Mulder (David Duchovy) and Scully (Gillian Anderson). Diyah Pera/Twentieth Century Fox hide caption

itoggle caption Diyah Pera/Twentieth Century Fox
David Duchovy and Gillian Anderson in front of a stained-glass window

X factor: The plot's still secret, but count on a reprise of the simmering sexual tension between agents Mulder (David Duchovy) and Scully (Gillian Anderson).

Diyah Pera/Twentieth Century Fox
Chris Carter in a parka, with camera, on a snowy mountainside i

X-Files creator Chris Carter: "Our old paranoia is back ... in new form," he says. Diyah Pera/Twentieth Century Fox hide caption

itoggle caption Diyah Pera/Twentieth Century Fox
Chris Carter in a parka, with camera, on a snowy mountainside

X-Files creator Chris Carter: "Our old paranoia is back ... in new form," he says.

Diyah Pera/Twentieth Century Fox

It's been six years since fans of The X-Files have enjoyed a fresh dose of that show's spooky brand of paranormal-paranoia entertainment.

And there's a cold truth out there: Some of those fans just don't care about the adventures of FBI agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully they way they used to. They've moved on to shows like Lost and Battlestar Galactica.

So when the new movie The X-Files: I Want To Believe opens July 25, enticing lapsed X-Files fans into theaters may be a challenge — especially given the last two seasons of the television show, which were widely considered unsatisfying, and the first X-Files movie, which came out 10 years ago to mixed reviews

How will a show so iconic in the 1990s resonate with audiences today — particularly with those too young to have developed a relationship with the show when it first aired?

"This is a stand-alone scary movie that doesn't require that you ever saw The X-Files in the first place," says producer and co-writer Frank Spotnitz.

The X-Files peaked in popularity during the Clinton administration, and the cultural mood has since changed, admits creator Chris Carter.

But Carter believes The X-Files may be particularly well equipped to take on an era newly preoccupied with aliens, government truth-telling and the workings of national security.

"I think of the show as beginning in an era that was post-Watergate, but it ended in an era that was post-9/11, and now it's coming back in an era that is post-post 9/11," Carter says.

"And while I believe a lot of our old paranoia is back, it's back in new form."

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