Stages Of Grief For The 'BPP': Bargaining

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Bargaining is the third stage of grief. It involves a bit of denial— you know the end is near, but you just hope that there is something you can do to change it. If you promise to be better and try harder, then maybe, just maybe, you'll be saved.

It's just total and utter desperation down on your knees begging and pleading, and it's how I'm dealing with the end of The Bryant Park Project. Originally, I thought the best song for bargaining would be ABBA's "Take a Chance on Me," but after some heated discussion with Alison, who had a different song in mind, we brokered a deal of sorts, a compromise.

The thing is we don't have a lot of time left, and we aren't the only ones dealing this — the people on our blog are the ones doing the real bargaining on behalf of the BPP. They came up with a lot of ways to save the show, a lot of practical ways.

Sarah Lee suggested making it an hour long show instead of two. Jenn said she was ready to "put on her camouflage and fight the man against this injustice." Janet listed the number for NPR listener services, which is is 202-513-3232 by the way, and said BPP fans should tell them again and again what they think of the cancellation. Megan Shanley used the blog to write an angry letter directly to the "higher ups." A lot of people offered us their money, Rob King pledged $50 and Andy Orr offered to organize a personal fund drive or "money bomb." And we can't forget the Radio Sweethearts and their campaign a la Ferris Bueller to save us, which gave birth to the Save the B-P-P Facebook group.

I get it. I don't want to let go either. I haven't cleaned my desk or my inbox because the thing is I still have hope that we can be saved — I do. I really believe in what we are doing here, and maybe all of us together can do something. There's a chance, and I'm not ready to let go yet.

So my submission for the Best Song in the World Today is "We Can Work it Out" by the Beatles.

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