Double Dutch Becomes Official Sport In New York

The popular urban street game called double Dutch, in which participants jump between two jump ropes swinging toward each other, eggbeater-style, is getting recognition. This school year, it becomes an official sport in the New York City school system.

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ANDREA SEABROOK, host:

Two jump ropes swing towards each other, sweeping the ground like an egg beater. Two, sometimes four, legs clear the ropes in a mad act of syncopation. This is double Dutch. It's named for the Dutch settlers who they say brought the game to New York.

This coming school year double Dutch becomes the official sport and official sport of the New York City school system. After basketball season ends in the spring, high school gyms across the city will fill with young people and the sound of sneakers squeaking impossibly fast. Flips will be flipped, foot works will be fancied, cheers will be cheered.

We're not sure what the Dutch would make of all of this but consider the last sport New York's public schools added: cricket. We think a chirp of pleasure might be due.

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