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Ratatat: Electronic Rock With A Pulse

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Ratatat: Electronic Rock With A Pulse

Ratatat: Electronic Rock With A Pulse

Ratatat: Electronic Rock With A Pulse

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Ratatat's latest album is called LP3. courtesy of the artists hide caption

toggle caption courtesy of the artists

When crafting instrumental music, artists have to convey personality and a point of view without falling back on vocals — or, more to the point, expressions of human emotion. The best, like the Brooklyn band Ratatat, find a way to carve out a distinct sound anyway.

Over the course of three albums — five, counting two collections of remixes — Ratatat has become a go-to purveyor of hooky, electronic rock music that transcends the atmospherics of the group's fellow laptop-wielders. The duo of Evan Mast and Mike Stroud has shifted toward the rock side of the electronic-rock divide in recent years, incorporating live percussion on the new LP3.

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