NPR logo

Ratatat: Electronic Rock With A Pulse

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/93010245/92983934" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Ratatat: Electronic Rock With A Pulse

Ratatat: Electronic Rock With A Pulse

Ratatat: Electronic Rock With A Pulse

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/93010245/92983934" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Ratatat's latest album is called LP3. courtesy of the artists hide caption

toggle caption
courtesy of the artists

When crafting instrumental music, artists have to convey personality and a point of view without falling back on vocals — or, more to the point, expressions of human emotion. The best, like the Brooklyn band Ratatat, find a way to carve out a distinct sound anyway.

Over the course of three albums — five, counting two collections of remixes — Ratatat has become a go-to purveyor of hooky, electronic rock music that transcends the atmospherics of the group's fellow laptop-wielders. The duo of Evan Mast and Mike Stroud has shifted toward the rock side of the electronic-rock divide in recent years, incorporating live percussion on the new LP3.