Video Gamers Cramping, Not Climbing

  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/9307893/9307896" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
  • Transcript

The popularity of video games may have an unintended safety benefit: fewer children are falling out of trees. Britain's Daily Telegraph reports that hospital admissions for tree-related accidents are way down since 1999. On the other hand, a spike has been seen in repetitive-stress injuries among young people.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

The popularity of video games among kids may be having an unintended benefit: Fewer kids are falling out of trees. Britain's Daily Telegraph reports hospital admissions for tree-related accidents are down more than a third since 1999, which may mean fewer kids are climbing trees and instead hunched over PlayStations indoors. Support for that theory - there's a spike in kids being treated for repetitive-stress injuries.

It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.