Advocates Want More Focus on Domestic AIDS Cases

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One in two of persons newly infected with HIV in the U.S. is African-American, according to a new report from the Black AIDS Institute. Given the alarming numbers, some are pushing for more government resources aimed at resolving the country's domestic health crisis, particularly among minorities. Phill Wilson, of the Black AIDS Institute, explains.

Op-Ed: AIDS Must Be Fought At Home, Too

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On World AIDS Day, researcher Robert Gallo salutes President Bush's successful efforts to fight the disease overseas. But with infections on the rise in America's inner cities, Gallo argues that similar strategies must be employed in the U.S.

Gallo's op-ed, "Fighting AIDS At Home," appeared Nov. 16 in The Washington Post.

Correction Aug. 4, 2008

We initially said: "One out of every two Black Americans is infected with HIV, according to a new report from the Black Aids Institute." In fact, as the story now says, "One in two persons newly infected with HIV in the U.S. is African-American ... "

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