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Along Gulf Coast, Talk Of Restoring Wetlands

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Along Gulf Coast, Talk Of Restoring Wetlands

Katrina & Beyond

Along Gulf Coast, Talk Of Restoring Wetlands

Along Gulf Coast, Talk Of Restoring Wetlands

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/93313791/93313759" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Researchers want the Gulf Coast's wetlands to look more like Louisiana's Lafitte Cypress Swamp (pictured). It is thought the wetlands will serve as a speed bump against major storms. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Andrea Hsu/NPR

Researchers want the Gulf Coast's wetlands to look more like Louisiana's Lafitte Cypress Swamp (pictured). It is thought the wetlands will serve as a speed bump against major storms.

Andrea Hsu/NPR

Researchers working along the Gulf Coast are proposing the restoration of the region's wetlands, which act as a natural speed bump for storms. The plan is part of discussions of how best to protect against another hurricane.

Students from the University of Wisconsin-Madison are studying a 430-acre triangle within New Orleans' Bayou Bienvenue. Their work is part of a proposal aimed at restoring a cypress swamp.

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