China's Relationship With Humiliation Improves For over 150 years, the Chinese have felt victimized and disrespected by foreign powers, says China scholar Orville Schell. With the Olympics, the country's leaders are hoping to regain honor as a great and powerful nation.
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China's Relationship With Humiliation Improves

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China's Relationship With Humiliation Improves

China's Relationship With Humiliation Improves

China's Relationship With Humiliation Improves

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For over 150 years, the Chinese have felt victimized and disrespected by foreign powers, mostly from the West says China scholar Orville Schell. With the Olympics, China hopes to regain its national honor as a great and powerful nation. Schell tells Madeleine Brand how the Olympics mark the end of a long period of national humiliation.