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Obama Candidacy Brings 'Pride and Hope'

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Obama Candidacy Brings 'Pride and Hope'

Obama Candidacy Brings 'Pride and Hope'

Obama Candidacy Brings 'Pride and Hope'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/93940890/93940875" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Former deputy attorney general Eric Holder, right, walks with Caroline Kennedy, daughter of the late John F. Kennedy, in Washington on June 25, 2008. Getty Images hide caption

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Former deputy attorney general Eric Holder, right, walks with Caroline Kennedy, daughter of the late John F. Kennedy, in Washington on June 25, 2008.

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Tell Me More begins its series What If?, which features conversations with influential leaders about one question arising from Sen. Barack Obama's historic candidacy for president: How might a first Black president of the United States challenge expectations, preconceptions or stereotypes in America?

Eric Holder, Jr., is an influential voice in the Obama campaign. The former deputy attorney general, now a senior legal advisor to the presumptive presidential nominee, was one of two vetters — along with Caroline Kennedy, daughter of the late John F. Kennedy — in Obama's search for a vice president.

In a recent conversation at his home in Washington, D.C., the pioneering attorney describes the significance of the Illinois senator's candidacy, and how the election of a black president could redefine the world's perception of leadership.

Holder, who himself made history in 1993 as the first African-American to serve as U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, also explains why he thinks the recent selection of Sen. Joe Biden as Obama's running mate makes for a winning ticket in November.