'Boss' Fans Share Tips On Rockin' A Political Party

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A Bruce Springsteen concert i

Bruce Springsteen performs at a recent concert in Germany. His fans at a Pennsylvania concert shared some tips on how to stand out in the crowd at Obama's acceptance speech. Volker Hartmann/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Volker Hartmann/AFP/Getty Images
A Bruce Springsteen concert

Bruce Springsteen performs at a recent concert in Germany. His fans at a Pennsylvania concert shared some tips on how to stand out in the crowd at Obama's acceptance speech.

Volker Hartmann/AFP/Getty Images
A tent outside Invesco Field, where Barack Obama will formally accept his party's nomination. i

A tent outside Invesco Field will have an interior replica of Air Force One and full-size replica of the Oval Office. Barack Obama will accept his party's nomination outside the tent in front of a crowd of 70,000. Giant video screens and a light show will be part of the presentation, too. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images
A tent outside Invesco Field, where Barack Obama will formally accept his party's nomination.

A tent outside Invesco Field will have an interior replica of Air Force One and full-size replica of the Oval Office. Barack Obama will accept his party's nomination outside the tent in front of a crowd of 70,000. Giant video screens and a light show will be part of the presentation, too.

John Moore/Getty Images

The atmosphere at Invesco Field when Barack Obama accepts the Democratic presidential nomination on Thursday will look and feel like a rock concert. This may present a challenge for the delegates to the Democratic National Convention. Many of those legislators haven't been to a stadium show in years and, let's face it, may need a little refresher course in how to properly rock out.

At a recent Bruce Springsteen concert in central Pennsylvania, fans offered their advice on how to best enjoy Obama's speech.

The Tailgate — Hardcore fans of "The Boss" show up in the parking lot hours early to slug back beers and listen to "Born to Run" on the car stereo. Alcohol won't be allowed at Invesco Field, but the Springsteen fans did recommend getting fired up by listening to some classic Obama speeches. The 2004 DNC keynote address, perhaps. Or his rousing speech from the Jefferson Jackson dinner in Des Moines.

The Attire — At a rock show you are only as cool as your T-shirt. Obama gear is mandatory, but you need to prove that you listened to him before he was popular. If you have a campaign shirt from Obama's Senate run or from his time in the Illinois state Legislature, lord it over the newbies.

The Toys — Inflatable beach balls are always welcome at a rock concert. Inflatable dolls are in poor taste.

A Thousand Points Of Light — Outside the Springsteen concert was a trash can filled with lighters. The days of holding the flame over your head during his slow songs are so over. So delegates, leave the Zippo at home. Your cell phone held aloft will do in a pinch, but one Springsteen fan declared it a lame-o move.

Shut Your Mouth — No. 1 one complaint of Springsteen fans: people who scream out obscure songs they want The Boss to play. He's got a set list, people. And by the way, he can't hear you. So if you're attending the Obama speech, don't yell out, "Do the 'Yes We Can' song!" And don't sing along during the slow parts.

Lighten The Mood — Some Springsteen fans tell me it would funny to yell out "Freebird!" in between speeches. These people, I should note, were drunk.

Down In Front — The other big concert no-no is blocking views. You should only stand up if the people behind you are standing. Which I guess means the initial standing onus is on the guy in row ZZ. And if you are tempted to get on your boyfriend's or girlfriend's shoulders use this rule: If you are better-looking than the candidate, no one will mind.

Don't Complain — No matter how bad your seat. No matter how hot it gets. No matter how loud the guy is next to you. Quit yer whinin'. Springsteen fans say they never recall the bad parts of a concert, only that they were there. And remember, Democratic delegates: Springsteen always has another tour. Obama only gets one shot to rock the 2008 convention.

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