Democratic Senator Offers Convention Advice

Democratic U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar advises Republican delegates about fun things to do in the Twin Cities during their nominating convention.

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

One Midwestern city that will be hopping next week is, of course, Saint Paul, Minnesota, where Minnesotans will find themselves knee-deep in Republican delegates. Now, last week we had a Republican son of Denver give Democrats advice on where to go in his hometown. To advise Republican delegates, we're joined by a Democratic daughter of the Twin Cities, U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar. Thanks very much for being with us.

Senator AMY KLOBUCHAR (Democrat, Minnesota): Well, it's great to be on. And I'm looking forward to our new visitors in Minnesota.

SIMON: Well, first off, you're just back from the Democratic convention in Denver. Any advice on how delegates should pace themselves to get through the four days?

Senator KLOBUCHAR: Well, in Denver, you needed a lot of water, no offense. Minnesota is land of 10,000 lakes. You don't have to worry about that quite as much. But I think part of it is wearing comfortable shoes is important and to not plan too many things because it always takes longer to get places than you thought. At one point, I nearly missed one of my convention speeches because we got in traffic and I had to commandeer three golf carts to get there. I finally made it. But anyway, it can be very complicated.

SIMON: Is there a place they shouldn't leave town without going to?

Senator KLOBUCHAR: Well, first of all, they have to go our state fair if they're there early in the week. It's a Minnesota institution. Some of my favorite sights there are the butter sculpture carving contest where we have Princess Kay of the Milky Way and her Court. And their heads are carved in hunks of butter, huge butter busts and so...

SIMON: Will there be a butter bust John McCain this week?

Senator KLOBUCHAR: There won't be a butter bust John McCain. There could easily, however, be a crop art John McCain, which is somewhere else I would suggest people to go, to the crop art area. You see, you know, Elvis made out of various barley and corn and different portraits that are finely done, and there's ribbons every year. But anyway, the butter bust is my favorite.

SIMON: You got me interested.

Senator KLOBUCHAR: So that's one thing that I would suggest the delegates - it's in the dairy building right across from my booth which is between the haunted house, the snake zoo and the pork chop on a stick.

SIMON: Pork chop - wait, hold on, pork chop on a stick?

Senator KLOBUCHAR: Everything is on a stick at the Minnesota Fair. There's fried walleye on a stick. The newest entry this year is chocolate covered bacon on a stick.

SIMON: Senator on a stick?

Senator KLOBUCHAR: No. They don't have a senator on a stick.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SIMON: I had to ask.

Senator KLOBUCHAR: But you know, they do - sometimes politicians put their brochures on a stick. Then we have things that are sort of special spots that people must see. For instance, the Mary Tyler Moore statue commemorating where she threw her hat up in the air, you know, with the music...

SIMON: Yes. Right, "You're Going to Make it After All," right? Yeah.

Senator KLOBUCHAR: Doo, doo, doo-doo, doo-doo, doo-doo that music. And then you can stand there and do it yourself and take your picture next to it.

SIMON: Ha, throw up the little hat, you mean?

Senator KLOBUCHAR: A lot of delegates wear hats. And if they're going there and they want to take their picture next to the Mary Tyler Moore statue, they probably want to wear a hat.

SIMON: Senator, it's so nice of you to find the time for us. Thanks very much.

Senator KLOBUCHAR: It's a lot of fun.

SIMON: Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar.

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