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Amtrak Train Runs Out Of Gas

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Amtrak Train Runs Out Of Gas

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Amtrak Train Runs Out Of Gas

Amtrak Train Runs Out Of Gas

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This week, an Amtrak train ran out of gas going from Los Angeles to San Diego. It had to be be pushed the final 15 miles.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

This is Weekend Edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Coming up, we bring on de funk. But first...

(Soundbite of music)

SIMON: Well, running out of peanut butter crackers in the snack car, that's one thing. But fuel? This week an Amtrak train traveling to San Diego from Los Angeles ran out of diesel fuel about 15 miles short of downtown. An Amtrak spokeswoman told The New York Times, it's not uncommon for trains to run out of fuel here. It happens from time to time. They are fueled once a day. In this week's episode, another train was brought in to push the stalled cars those last 15 miles into town, delivering the passengers at 1:30 in the morning. Many preferred to just leave the train and make their own way home. I wonder if Amtrak has considered just rigging up huge sails on their trains.

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