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Ferraro: 'Wonderful To See Woman On Natl. Ticket'

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Ferraro: 'Wonderful To See Woman On Natl. Ticket'

Election 2008

Ferraro: 'Wonderful To See Woman On Natl. Ticket'

Ferraro: 'Wonderful To See Woman On Natl. Ticket'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/94143843/94145177" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Geraldine Ferraro applauds at a rally for Hillary Clinton in June, 2008. hide caption

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Geraldine Ferraro applauds at a rally for Hillary Clinton in June, 2008.

Ferraro pictured in 1985, just after her unsuccessful run for office with Democratic presidential candidate Walter Mondale. Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Ferraro pictured in 1985, just after her unsuccessful run for office with Democratic presidential candidate Walter Mondale.

Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

In 1984, Geraldine Ferraro became the first female vice presidential pick on a major party ticket. Democrat Walter Mondale selected the former New York Congresswoman as his running mate in a race that they later lost to Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush.

Now, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin joins Ferraro as the second woman on a major party ticket — on Friday, Sen. John McCain announced Palin would be his running mate.

"It's great to be the first," Ferraro says, "but I don't want to be the only. And so now it is wonderful to see a woman on a national ticket."

McCain's choice means that the 2008 presidential race most likely will produce a historic result: the first African-American president or the first female vice president.

Ferraro talks with Jacki Lyden about Palin, and what has changed in the 24 years since she ran for vice president.

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