Hurricane Gustav Swells To Dangerous Cat 4 Storm

Gustav developed into a Category 4 hurricane on Saturday and forecasters say it could gain yet more power. It is on a track to hit the U.S. Gulf Coast, three years after Hurricane Katrina.

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JACKI LYDEN, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Jacki Lyden.

We'll start today in the middle of Hurricane Gustav, literally. NPR's Jon Hamilton is on the line. Jon, tell me, where are you?

JON HAMILTON: Well, we're maybe 20 miles from Havana right now. We've been flying in and around Hurricane Gustav at about 10,000 feet. We've actually flown right through the hurricane several times today.

LYDEN: What are you flying in?

HAMILTON: We're flying in a C-130 cargo plane. It has four engines and it's an indestructible plane that is popular for taking through hurricanes because it's been through everything and it doesn't seem to mind.

LYDEN: How's it look from up there?

HAMILTON: It is a majestic storm, I got to tell you. It's a very, very clear eye wall and it's - if I have to compare the look of it to a stadium where it looks like there's seats going up and up and up. And the architecture of it is extremely clear, which is quite unusual and something you only find with very strong, very well defined storms.

LYDEN: Thank you very much, Jon.

HAMILTON: You're welcome.

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