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This Historic Week: Obama's Nomination

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This Historic Week: Obama's Nomination

Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL)

This Historic Week: Obama's Nomination

This Historic Week: Obama's Nomination

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  • Transcript

This week, Sen. Barack Obama became the first African American to lead a major party's ticket. Rep. John Lewis, Maya Angelou, former President Jimmy Carter, Oprah Winfrey and Marian Wright Edelman reflect on this historic moment.

JACKI LYDEN, host:

It's been a week for the political history books in this country. Barack Obama's nomination for president inspired figures all along the political spectrum. Here are just a few voices:

Ms. MAYA ANGELOU (Author): I never thought I would live to see it but now it can happen.

Former President JIMMY CARTER: I think and believe that this nomination, I hope the election, of Barack Obama will bring an end to that heritage of racism that existed ever since our nation was founded.

Ms. OPRAH WINFREY (TV Host): Just seeing him on stage, I cried my eyelashes off. I woke up this morning and I went to Google and I looked at the Martin Luther King full speech from 45 years ago where he talked about the promise of democracy and tonight I feel that that promise was fulfilled.

Ms. MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN (Children's Rights Activist): This is a wonderful occasion because I think it is, as the March on Washington was, a marvelous symbol of this country's continuing struggle to be who it wants to says to be. I think it would make Dr. King very, very happy and that the country, I think, has hope again.

Representative JOHN LEWIS (Democrat, Georgia): I think all over America and many parts of the world, the hopes, the longings, the aspiration and the dreams will be hanging on every word that he's saying. It's going to be incredible.

LYDEN: That was Congressman and long-time civil rights leader John Lewis, and before that Maya Angelou, former President Jimmy Carter, Oprah Winfrey, and children's rights activist Marian Wright Edelman.

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