Black Republicans Explain GOP Appeal Since the 1930s, most African Americans have cast their ballots for the Democratic Party. But the party of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass offers a platform that some black voters find appealing. For more, NPR's Tony Cox speaks with Ron Christie and Renee Amoore.
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Black Republicans Explain GOP Appeal

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Black Republicans Explain GOP Appeal

Black Republicans Explain GOP Appeal

Black Republicans Explain GOP Appeal

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Sen. John McCain poses for a picture with attendees at the 99th annual NAACP convention. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Since the 1930s, most African Americans have cast their ballots for the Democratic Party. But the party of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass offers a platform that some black voters find appealing.

For more, NPR's Tony Cox speaks with Ron Christie — former special assistant in the Bush-Cheney administration — and Renee Amoore, deputy chairman of Pennsylvania's Republican Party.