NPR logo Memories Of Sept. 11, Preserved And Bright

Memories Of Sept. 11, Preserved And Bright

As families who lost loved ones on Sept. 11, 2001, rebuild their lives, they've also found ways to commemorate those who died in the attacks. Nearly 800 conversations about the people who died that day have already been recorded in a program run by StoryCorps and the National September 11 Memorial and Museum.

The project has the goal of collecting at least one recording from the families of each of the nearly 3,000 victims. Many of them tell their stories in StoryCorps booths; nearly 300 others have recorded their memories of that day in their hometowns.

The recordings about that day, destined for the World Trade Center Memorial Museum, are also being deposited at the Library of Congress. A selection of memories — about sons and fathers, and survival — is below:

Keith and Grete Meerholz

Keith and Grete Meerholz's Story

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Grete and Keith Meerholz at StoryCorps
StoryCorps

For Keith Meerholz, an insurance broker for Marsh & McLennan in the North Tower, Sept. 11, 2001, is a day he and his wife, Grete, recall with fear.

Meerholz was on an express elevator to his 100th-floor office when the first plane hit.

Monique Ferrer

Monique Ferrer

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Monique Ferrer
StoryCorps

At 9:04 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001, Monique Ferrer got a call from her ex-husband, Michael Trinidad. He was at work, on the 103rd floor of the World Trade Center's North Tower.

Trinidad wanted to talk about their children.

Elaine and John Leinung

Elaine and John Leinung

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Elaine and John Leinung
StoryCorps

In New York, Elaine and John Leinung recorded how the attacks affected their lives.

The couple lost their son, Paul Battaglia, who worked in the World Trade Center.

Arlene Sullivan and Norene Schneider

Hear Schneider and Sullivan's Story

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Sullivan's mother, Arlene Sullivan, and sister, Norene Schneider
StoryCorps

When he died, Tommy Sullivan, who was 38, left a wife and two sons. Recently, Sullivan's mother, Arlene Sullivan, and sister, Norene Schneider, discussed what Tommy was like as a little boy.

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