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Remembering Henry Steinway

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Remembering Henry Steinway

Remembrances

Remembering Henry Steinway

Remembering Henry Steinway

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Henry Z. Steinway, the great-grandson of the founder of the legendary piano-making company, died Thursday in New York. He was 93. He was the last of his family to run the company that was started in 1853. The company was sold to CBS Corp. in 1977. Steve Inskeep has this remembrance.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business comes from New York. It's a eulogy to a man who ran a company founded about the same time as the investment bank, Lehman Brothers. Unlike Lehman Brothers, this company is still going strong. It sells pianos, not securities, and our farewell is to Henry Z. Steinway. The Z stands for Zeigler. He's the great-grandson of a German immigrant who founded a piano-making company back in 1853. His company would become one of the premier piano companies in the world. And his great-grandson ran the company until 1977, when he sold it to CBS. But Steinway continued to visit Steinway Hall, which is attached to the main showroom on Manhattan's West 57th Street, until a few months before his death yesterday at the age of 93.

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INSKEEP: And that's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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