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Saying the Right Thing, in 100 Words or Less

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Saying the Right Thing, in 100 Words or Less

Saying the Right Thing, in 100 Words or Less

Saying the Right Thing, in 100 Words or Less

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9505784/9505785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anyone can put themselves in a situation where they do or say the wrong thing. But, says commentator Daniel Pinkwater, it's rare to find someone who has presented themselves exactly the right way. In his local newspaper, Pinkwater found what he calls "the most concise piece of writing" he has ever seen.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Anyone can put themselves in a situation where they do or say the wrong thing. But commentator Daniel Pinkwater says it's rare to find someone who has presented themselves exactly the right way. Pinkwater was looking through his local newspaper and found what he calls the most concise piece of writing he's ever seen.

DANIEL PINKWATER: This was in the personals column of the Poughkeepsie Journal, under women seeking men: Baked ham, lasagna, roast beef, apple pie. I know what you like. I have what you need. Phone number. It only ran once, but what would you expect?

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NORRIS: Daniel Pinkwater's new novel, "The Neddiad," is due out this month.

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NORRIS: You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

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