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Bush Predicts Congress Will Pass Rescue

President Bush makes a statement outside the Oval Office Sept. 26, 2008, urging Congress to pass the administration's $700 billion bailout plan to save the nation from financial crisis. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Bush makes a statement outside the Oval Office Sept. 26, 2008, urging Congress to pass the administration's $700 billion bailout plan to save the nation from financial crisis.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Bush says there are disagreements over aspects of the proposed $700 billion Wall Street bailout, but "we are going to get a package passed."

He made a terse public statement outside the Oval Office Friday morning, the day after an apparent agreement on the broad outline of a relief bill fell apart.

The president said he expected that individual lawmakers would have disagreements about the details of the plan but said there is no choice but to act. Bush said, "There is no disagreement that something substantial must be done."

Following is a transcript of the president's remarks:

"Good morning. My administration continues to work with the Congress on a rescue plan. And we need a rescue plan. This is — it's hard work. Our proposal is a big proposal. And the reason it's big and substantial is because we got a big problem. We also need to move quickly.

"Now, any time you have a plan this big that is moving this quickly, that requires legislative approval, it creates challenges. Members want to be heard. They want to be able to express their opinions, and they should be allowed to express their opinions. There are disagreements over aspects of the rescue plan, but there is no disagreement that something substantial must be done.

"The legislative process is sometimes not very pretty, but we are going to get a package passed. We will rise to the occasion. Republicans and Democrats will come together and pass a substantial rescue plan."

From the Associated Press and Federal News Service

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