Magnet Meltdown At The Large Hadron Collider

Large Hadron Collider i i

hide captionCERN Director General Robert Aymar said the setback to the particle accelerator was "undoubtedly a psychological blow."

Jean-Pierre Clatot/AFP/Getty Images
Large Hadron Collider

CERN Director General Robert Aymar said the setback to the particle accelerator was "undoubtedly a psychological blow."

Jean-Pierre Clatot/AFP/Getty Images

Magnets cooled to extremely low temperatures are an essential element of the massive particle accelerator. Some of these magnets may have overheated last week, causing the Collider to fail its preliminary tests — possibly delaying the project by a year.

Dan Hooper, an associate scientist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, explains what happened to the LHC, and what physicists are doing to fix it.

Books Featured In This Story

Nature's Blueprint
Nature's Blueprint

Supersymmetry and the Search for a Unified Theory of Matter and Force

by Dan Hooper

Hardcover, 230 pages | purchase

close

Purchase Featured Books

  • Nature's Blueprint
  • Supersymmetry and the Search for a Unified Theory of Matter and Force
  • Dan Hooper

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: