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Rhode Island Festival Commemorates End Of Slave Trade

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Rhode Island Festival Commemorates End Of Slave Trade

U.S.

Rhode Island Festival Commemorates End Of Slave Trade

Rhode Island Festival Commemorates End Of Slave Trade

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Hear an extended conversation with the panel from the Rhode Island Freedom Festival.

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/95465836/95492005" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Host Michel Martin (L) conducts a panel with James Campbell, professor of Africana Studies at Brown University, and Mary-Kim Arnold, executive director of the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities. TMM/TMM hide caption

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Host Michel Martin kicks off Rhode Island's Freedom Festival with a conversation on a bicentennial commemoration, marking the end of the transatlantic slave trade.

Martin is joined by Katrina Browne, writer, director and producer of the documentary Traces of the Trade; James Campbell, professor of Africana Studies at Brown University; Mary-Kim Arnold, executive director of the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities and the Rev. Jeffery A. Williams, pastor at the Cathedral of Life church.

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