Rin Tin Tin Movie Sparks Lawsuit Daphne Hereford, the owner of Rin Tin Tin Inc., is suing a film studio for trademark infringement. She says the dogs used in the film Finding Rin Tin Tin are not associated with Rin Tin Tin or related to the loyal German shepherd.
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Rin Tin Tin Movie Sparks Lawsuit

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Rin Tin Tin Movie Sparks Lawsuit

Rin Tin Tin Movie Sparks Lawsuit

Rin Tin Tin Movie Sparks Lawsuit

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As a puppy, Rin Tin Tin was rescued from a bombed-out kennel in France during World War I. He went on to star in 26 films for Warner Bros., and his descendants carried on the tradition in a beloved TV series of the 1950s.

Now Rin Tin Tin Inc. is suing a Hollywood studio.

Daphne Hereford, the owner of Rin Tin Tin Inc., grew up with descendants of the loyal German shepherd. In 1957, her grandmother started acquiring dogs from Lee Duncan, the soldier who rescued Rin Tin Tin in 1918. The family has owned Rin Tin Tin V through Rin Tin Tin X.

Hereford is suing the makers of the film Finding Rin Tin Tin for trademark infringement. She says the dogs used in the films are not associated with Rin Tin Tin or related to Rin Tin Tin.