The First Woman To Run For President — In 1872 In the 19th century, Victoria Woodhull was a clairvoyant, a businesswoman and an advocate for women's rights and sexual freedom. But she is best known as the first woman to run for president. Her 1872 campaign came at a time when most women did not even have the right to vote.
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The First Woman To Run For President — In 1872

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The First Woman To Run For President — In 1872

The First Woman To Run For President — In 1872

The First Woman To Run For President — In 1872

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/95579577/95674152" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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First of a five-part series

Victoria Claflin Woodhull, circa 1872. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Bettmann/Corbis

Victoria Claflin Woodhull, circa 1872.

Bettmann/Corbis

In the 19th century, Victoria Claflin Woodhull was many things: a clairvoyant, a businesswoman, an advocate for women's rights and sexual freedom, and a magnet for media attention and scandal.

But she is best known as the first woman to run for president. Her 1872 campaign came at a time when most women did not even have the right to vote.

Radio Diaries talked with Scott Claflin, a descendant of Woodhull, and Amanda Frisken, who wrote Victoria Woodhull's Sexual Revolution.

This story was produced by Joe Richman and Samara Freemark of Radio Diaries.