NPR logo

Josh Brolin: Playing The President

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/95670382/95670380" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Josh Brolin: Playing The President

Josh Brolin: Playing The President

Josh Brolin: Playing The President

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/95670382/95670380" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Despite his initial opposition to his role as W., Josh Brolin says the quality of the script led him to embrace his Texas kinship with President Bush. Vince Bucci/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Vince Bucci/Getty Images

Despite his initial opposition to his role as W., Josh Brolin says the quality of the script led him to embrace his Texas kinship with President Bush.

Vince Bucci/Getty Images

The starring role as George W. Bush in the new Oliver Stone film W. is the latest in a series of high-profile parts for actor Josh Brolin.

But it wasn't a role he welcomed, Brolin tells Fresh Air contributor Dave Davies. At least not initially.

"When somebody like Oliver Stone ... came to me and said, 'I see George W. in you,' it was disconcerting, to say the least," Brolin says. "Without reading the script, I was very reactionary. I imagined it to be something in the present, and having to do with the war.

"And it wasn't until I read [the script] that I finally understood, you know, it was one of the great acting challenges for me ... to follow this guy's life from 21 years old to 58 years old."

Brolin starred in the Academy Award-winning No Country for Old Men in 2007. He's also been seen recently in American Gangster and In The Valley of Elah.

He talks to Dave Davies about preparing for the role of George W. Bush, about growing up on a ranch as the son of an actor father and a mother who didn't much like Hollywood, and about his "serious sideline" as a day trader in the stock markets.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.