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'Black Book' Takes Verhoeven Back Home

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'Black Book' Takes Verhoeven Back Home

'Black Book' Takes Verhoeven Back Home

'Black Book' Takes Verhoeven Back Home

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9567383/9567386" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sebastian Koch and Carice van Houten star in the World War II thriller Black Book. Jaap Vrenegoor/Content Film/Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Jaap Vrenegoor/Content Film/Sony Pictures Classics

Sebastian Koch and Carice van Houten star in the World War II thriller Black Book.

Jaap Vrenegoor/Content Film/Sony Pictures Classics

The 68-year-old director Paul Verhoeven hasn't made a film in his native Holland since his 1983 thriller The Fourth Man.

That picture led to a long and lucrative career making Hollywood action, suspense, and sci-fi movies, including Starship Troopers, Showgirls and Basic Instinct.

For Black Book, Verhoeven returns to the milieu of his 1977 film Soldier of Orange, which focused on the Dutch resistance in World War II, along with those who betrayed it. Critic David Edelstein says the story Verhoeven puts onscreen in Black Book is "lush and romantic" — and "old-fashioned in a way that's thrilling."