Why Going Negative Doesn't Work If you have turned on your TV within the last week you have probably noticed a spike in attack ads. A New York Times poll suggests that independent candidates are turned off by the strategy.
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Why Going Negative Doesn't Work

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Why Going Negative Doesn't Work

Why Going Negative Doesn't Work

Why Going Negative Doesn't Work

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If you have turned on your TV within the last week you have probably noticed a spike in attack ads. A New York Times poll suggests that independent candidates are turned off by the strategy. Madeleine Brand talks to Harvard Political Science professor Stephen Ansolobehere, author of Going Negative: How Political Advertising Alienates and Polarizes the American Electorate.