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Military Spouses Make Their Own Sacrifices

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Military Spouses Make Their Own Sacrifices

Military Spouses Make Their Own Sacrifices

Military Spouses Make Their Own Sacrifices

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Being married to someone in the military can be tough. There is the stress of repeated deployments, meaning managing the household alone. And it's hard to put down roots or build a career because the military usually requires people to move every few years.

According to a Rand Corp. study, military spouses earn less than their civilian counterparts, and they're more likely to be unemployed. One officer's wife calls this "the spouse tax" and says it's hurting the military's ability to groom its future leaders.

David Sommerstein reports from North Country Public Radio in Fort Drum, N.Y.

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