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Measuring 'the Decoy Effect' in Political Races

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Measuring 'the Decoy Effect' in Political Races

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Measuring 'the Decoy Effect' in Political Races

Measuring 'the Decoy Effect' in Political Races

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9585221/9585224" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The presence of a third candidate in political races often has the unintended effect of benefiting one or the other of the two front runners.

Shankar Vedantam of the Washington Post talks with Scott Simon about the psychological phenomenon known as "the decoy effect."

It may be at work right now in both the Democratic and Republican presidential primaries, and certainly has in the past.