Explaining Race-Tinged Presidential Bid To Kids

Child holds American flag and fake bank bill i i

hide captionA child holds an American flag and a fake bank bill bearing a portrait of U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Ill. Sen. Barack Obama during an Obama rally at the Crown Center Coliseum in Fayetteville, North Carolina, October 19, 2008.

Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images
Child holds American flag and fake bank bill

A child holds an American flag and a fake bank bill bearing a portrait of U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Ill. Sen. Barack Obama during an Obama rally at the Crown Center Coliseum in Fayetteville, North Carolina, October 19, 2008.

Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

This year's historic presidential campaign has given parents repeated opportunities to talk to kids about race. American families are talking about the candidates, and the role that race is playing in the campaign. But what are they telling the kids, especially over the past few weeks as the campaign has gotten more intense? And is it a new and tricky topic for most parents?

Some parents may choose to shield their children from these things. But others may find that impossible or prefer to use this as an opportunity to engage their children and challenge them to think about how they deal with these attitudes in their own lives.

Mocha Moms Jolene Ivey, Leslie Morgan Steiner, Renee Amoore and Joan Countryman talk about when to have those discussions, and why it is important to do so.

Remember, with Tell Me More the conversation never ends. We'd like to know: Have you found yourself talking with your children about race, ethnicity or gender or religion in connection with the presidential campaign? What are you saying? And what are they saying?

To tell us more and to compare notes with other listeners, go to www.npr.org/tellmemore. You can leave comments there or on our blog (found in the same location), or you can call our comment line at 202-842-3522.

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