Framingham State's 'Blah' Fundraising Faux Pax

A recent fundraising attempt by one Massachusetts college tried humor, but went over poorly. The letter from Framingham State College read: "With the recent economic downturn and loan crisis, it has become even more important for Framingham State College to receive your support. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." The school has since apologized to insulted alums.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

So let's say you tune in to All Things Considered and you hear me say this: Wall Street is pulling back in early trading as investors look over the latest batch of quarterly earnings. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. Would you feel with those blah, blah, blahs that I'm connecting with you? Well, that's the approach Framingham State College in Massachusetts used for a fundraising letter last month to appeal to younger alumni.

The letter read, "With the recent economic downturn and loan crisis, it has become even more important for Framingham State College to receive your support. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." And more blahs. More than 130 of them.

Well, some alumni were not amused. They called the letter insulting. Christopher Hendry, the school's vice president of college advancement and the guy who green-lighted the blah, blah, blah letter, has since apologized. Hendry says the school won't use the letter again. But he did point out that it did net about $2,000 from nearly 40 alumni who have never donated to Framingham State College before.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.