We Get the News, But Do We Retain It?

Wall-to-wall cable news and the Internet haven't made Americans more knowledgeable about national affairs. A Pew Research poll finds that in 1989, nearly three out of four Americans knew Dan Quayle was vice president. Today only 69 percent could name Dick Cheney. But top women are visible: Nearly half know Nancy Pelosi is speaker of the House and two-thirds know Condoleezza Rice is secretary of state.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Wall-to-wall cable news and the Internet haven't made Americans more knowledgeable about national affairs for the most part. A Pew Research poll finds that in 1989, nearly three out of four Americans knew Dan Quayle was vice president. Today, only 69 percent could name Dick Cheney. Still, top women are visible: Nearly half know Nancy Pelosi is the House speaker and two-thirds know Condoleezza Rice is secretary of state.

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