Poll: Workers Say They Relate Well To Their Bosses

A survey from the staffing firm Ranstad USA shows that 77 percent of employees say they relate to their supervisors positively. Nearly two-thirds had nice things to say about their manager. One company official suggests the economy could be one reason so many workers feel that way. But liking your boss doesn't mean you think he or she is competent. Only half of workers in the survey said that.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

OK. Our last word in business today is a sunnier note from the workplace. The word is "I like my boss." A survey from the staffing firm Ranstad USA shows that 77 percent of employees say they relate to their supervisors positively. Nearly two-thirds had nice things to say about their manager. Ranstad's Eric Buntin suggests the economy could be one reason so many people feel this way.

MONTAGNE: Perhaps they're focusing on that relationship and probably the manager is focusing on that relationship as well to drive connection, to drive engagement, and to make the most quality work situation so that the companies can succeed in the current environment.

MONTAGNE: But liking your boss doesn't mean you think he or she is competent. Only half of workers in the survey said that. And that's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News.

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