Hail To The 'Farmer-In-Chief'

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Michael Pollan, author of In Defense of Food and The Omnivore's Dilemma, believes that food policy should be high on the next president's agenda.

Pollan argues in an open letter in the New York Times that the way in which our food is produced, moved and consumed directly affects the life and vitality of the nation.

Food As A National Security Issue

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Journalist and writer Michael Pollan

Michael Pollan is a professor of science and environmental journalism at University of California at Berkeley. Alia Malley/Courtesy Penguin Group hide caption

itoggle caption Alia Malley/Courtesy Penguin Group

In an open letter to the next president, author Michael Pollan writes about the waning health of America's food systems — and warns that "the era of cheap and abundant food appears to be drawing to a close."

The future president's food policies, says Pollan, will have a large impact on a wide range of issues, including national security, climate change, energy independence and health care.

Pollan is the author of The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History Of Four Meals and In Defense OF Food: An Eater's Manifesto.

Books Featured In This Story

In Defense of Food

An Eater's Manifesto

by Michael Pollan

Hardcover, 244 pages | purchase

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Title
In Defense of Food
Subtitle
An Eater's Manifesto
Author
Michael Pollan

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The Omnivore's Dilemma

A Natural History of Four Meals

by Michael Pollan

Paperback, 450 pages | purchase

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Title
The Omnivore's Dilemma
Subtitle
A Natural History of Four Meals
Author
Michael Pollan

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