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Newspapers Endorse Presidential Candidates

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Newspapers Endorse Presidential Candidates

Election 2008

Newspapers Endorse Presidential Candidates

Newspapers Endorse Presidential Candidates

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Newspapers have been making presidential endorsements. Republican John McCain won the backing of his home state's largest paper, The Arizona Republic. The Chicago Tribune endorsed Chicago resident Barack Obama — the first time that paper has endorsed a Democratic candidate for president. And Obama received the backing from another paper you might not expect — the Anchorage Daily News. The state's largest newspaper was not swayed by the fact that McCain's running mate, Sarah Palin, is the state's governor.

(Soundbite of music)

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

This is the season when newspapers make presidential endorsements. Republican John McCain won the backing of his home state's largest paper, The Arizona Republic. The Chicago Tribune endorsed Chicago resident Barack Obama. It's the first time that paper has ever endorsed a Democrat for president. And Obama received the backing from another paper you might not expect, The Anchorage Daily News. Alaska's biggest newspaper was not swayed by McCain's running mate, Sarah Palin of Alaska. The editorial board said the crisis facing the country would, quote, "stretch the governor beyond her range."

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