Candidates Race Toward Finish Line

John McCain and Barack Obama are racing across the country, just three days now from the finish line: Election Day.

At a rally in Henderson, Nev., on Saturday, Obama's message was clear: Don't let up.

"Don't believe for a second that this election is over," he told supporters at a football field outside Las Vegas. "We are going to have to work like our future depends on it in these last three days, because it does. But I know this Nevada: The time for change has come. We have a righteous wind at our back."

Obama is focusing on Republican states that George Bush carried in 2004: Nevada, Colorado, Missouri, Ohio, Florida, North Carolina and Virginia.

McCain played defense in Virginia, a state that hasn't voted Democrat in 44 years. The camp recognizes that there's been a change in Virginia, including a lot of growth in the D.C. suburbs, which typically lean more Democratic than the rest of the state.

McCain echoed Obama in saying he's gaining momentum and that the race is not over.

"We're a few points down, my friends, but we're coming back. The Mac is back!" he told supporters in Springfield. He next turns his attention to Pennsylvania, which his campaign sees as his best chance to turn a blue state red.

The McCain team did not exploit a report out Saturday that Obama's aunt from Kenya is living illegally in Boston, calling it instead a "family matter." Obama's campaign said the candidate was unaware about her status and said it would return a $265 campaign donation she made. Foreign nationals are not permitted to donate to American presidential campaigns.

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