Le Big Mac Redux In France

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France is now the No. 1 overseas market for McDonald's, accounting for 13 percent of the company's global sales. As France faces a recession, McDonald's is proving a relative bargain in an expensive country. A double cheeseburger at a Mickey D's in Paris costs the equivalent of $10.70. One office worker told Bloomberg News he would pay nearly twice that if he ordered a burger and fries from a nearby bistro.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business comes from France. And the word is Le Big Mac. It always seemed like the French didn't like McDonald's. Maybe it's the taste. Maybe they see fast food as a symbol of America or globalization. Maybe they just have better food. But here's a reality check. France is now the number one overseas market for McDonald's. It accounts for 13 percent of the company's global sales.

And with France facing a recession, McDonald's is proving a relative bargain in an expensive country. A double cheeseburger at a Mickey D's in Paris is now the equivalent of $10.70, which apparently is a good price. One office worker told Bloomberg News he would have paid nearly twice that had he ordered a burger and fries from a nearby bistro. And that's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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