First Dog, Barney, Bites Reporter's Finger

President-elect Barack Obama promised his little girls a puppy for the White House, but they'll have to get past Barney first. The current White House dog, a Scottish terrier, bit a Reuters reporter Thursday. Jon Decker was trying to pet the usually friendly dog. Barney growled and snapped at his finger. The White House medical staff treated the bleeding finger. Barney held onto his territory, for now.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning, I am Renee Montagne. President-elect Obama did promise his little girls a puppy for the White House but they'll have to get past Barney first. The current White House dog, a Scottish terrier, bit a Reuters reporter Thursday. Jon Decker was trying to pet the usually friendly dog, but Barney was having none of it. Barney growled and snapped at his finger. The White House medical staff treated the bleeding finger and Barney held onto his territory, for now. It's Morning Edition.

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What Type Of Puppy Will The Obama Girls Pick?

While Beltway insiders are busy handicapping the Cabinet members of an Obama administration, others just want to talk about the next White House pet.

On election night, President-elect Barack Obama promised his daughters a puppy. Now Malia, 10, and Sasha, 7, must decide what type of dog to bring to the White House. Will it be a politically correct rescue dog or a trendy purebred?

Here, a look at beloved White House pets of the past.

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