NPR logo

'Law & Order' Moves Back To Wednesdays

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/96741775/96741929" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
'Law & Order' Moves Back To Wednesdays

Pop Culture

'Law & Order' Moves Back To Wednesdays

'Law & Order' Moves Back To Wednesdays

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/96741775/96741929" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dick Wolf grew up reading The Hardy Boys and other crime procedurals; he got his start in TV writing for Hill Street Blues. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

Dick Wolf grew up reading The Hardy Boys and other crime procedurals; he got his start in TV writing for Hill Street Blues.

Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

Dick Wolf once worked in advertising — shades of AMC's Mad Men — but he's best known as the creator of Law & Order, the longest running drama on network television.

This week, NBC moved the decorated crime procedural back to Wednesdays, after the 19th season opened to a poor showing on Friday nights, which is known for its low prime-time viewership.

The original, which premiered in 1990, has inspired more than one spinoff series: Law & Order: Special Victims Unit and Law & Order: Criminal Intent. And in 2003, Wolf published a large-format book of photos and essays, Law & Order: Crime Scenes.

Terry Gross talked to Wolf when the book was published about what he learned writing for advertising campaigns, how the Law & Order team chooses everything from the extras who play the show's dead bodies to the stories dramatized week after week, and the oddest thing he's ever seen at a real crime scene.

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 22, 2003.

Article continues after sponsorship

Related NPR Stories