Historic Inauguration Could Lead To Ticket Scalping

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) says she's disturbed by reports that tickets to President-elect Barack Obama's inauguration are being sold online for as much as $40,000. She says she's writing to eBay and other sites to make sure they're not involved in ticket scalping. The 240,000 available tickets are supposed to be free to the public and are given out through congressional offices. Feinstein is also working on a bill that would make it a federal crime to sell tickets to the inauguration.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today is about getting a ticket to that swearing-in ceremony. The word is forget eBay. California Senator Dianne Feinstein says she's disturbed by reports that some tickets are being sold online for as much as $40,000. She says she's writing to eBay, Craigslist, and other sites to make sure they're not involved in any inaugural ticket scalping. The 240,000 tickets are supposed to be free to the public and given out through congressional offices. Feinstein is also working on a bill that would make it a federal crime to sell tickets to the inauguration. That's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

And I'm Ari Shapiro.

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