Featured Artists in 'Il Corsaro'

Conductor Eve Queler

Conductor Eve Queler founded Opera Orchestra of New York in 1972, and since then has led the ensemble in more than 90 operas in concert at Carnegie Hall. hide caption

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Soprano Rossana Potenza, tenor Francisco Casanova and baritone C. Y. Liao star in Verdi's Il Corsaro, at Carnegie Hall.

Eve Queler

Music Director, Opera Orchestra of New York

Opera Orchestra of New York is renowned for its performances of seldom-heard repertory and its music director, Eve Queler, has conducted more than 90 operas in concert at Carnegie Hall. Among them are Mussorgsky's Khovanshchina, Wagner's Rienzi, Bizet's The Pearlfishers, Berlioz's Benvenuto Cellini and Verdi's I Lombardi. OONY's performance of Janacek's Jenufa was released on CD by BIS records and Queler's other recordings include Massenet's Le Cid with Plácido Domingo, Grace Bumbry, and Paul Plishka; Verdi's Aroldo with Montserrat Caballé; and Puccini's Edgar with Renata Scotto and Carlo Bergonzi.

As a guest conductor, Queler's performances include Tchaikovsky's Mazeppa with the Kirov Opera, Donizetti's Don Pasquale with the Hamburg Opera, Rossini's Tancredi with the Frankfurt Opera and Bellini's I Puritani at London's Royal Festival Hall, among many others. She has also appeared in concert with with a number of symphony orchestras, including the Philadelphia and Cleveland orchestras, the Montreal Symphony and the Rome Opera Orchestra. For two summers Queler has conducted opera galas at Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli, outside of Rome, and she will return for additional concerts there in 2007.

Rossana Potenza

Soprano (Medora)

A native of Foggia, Italy, Rossana Potenza was a prizewinner at the Rome Opera's Lauri-Volpi competition. Opera Orchestra of New York's Il Corsaro marked her first performance with OONY, and her first appearance at Carnegie Hall. In 2001, Rossana Potenza was featured in a joint concert with tenor Jose Carreras and in a series of sacred music concerts sponsored by the Vatican's Easter Festival. She has also appeared with Montserrat Caballe in Massenet's La Vierge, a performance later issued on DVD. Ms. Potenza previously sang with Eve Queler in 2002, at the Puccini Opera Gala in Tivoli, Italy.

Francisco Casanova

Tenor (Corrado)

Il Corsaro is Francisco Casanova's fourth appearance with Eve Queler and Opera Orchestra of New York. His previous OONY performances were in Halevy's La Juive, and in two other seldom-heard Verdi operas: The Battle of Legnano, and Attila. A native of the Dominican Republic, he was honored as the winner of OONY's Vidda Award and gave a sold out recital at Weill Hall in the fall of 2000. Casanova made his debut at Milan's La Scala singing Jacopo in Verdi's I Due Foscari, with Riccardo Muti conducting. His Vienna State Opera debut was as Eleazar in La Juive. Casanova has toured extensively in the United States, Italy, Germany, France, Spain and Israel.

C. Y. Liao

Baritone (Pasha Seid)

C. Y. Liao is a regular performer with Opera Orchestra of New York. His first Carnegie Hall appearance with OONY was in the spring of 2001, performing the role of Lord Cecil in Donizetti's Maria Stuarda, opposite Ruth Ann Swenson and Lauren Flanigan. In 2002, he performed the role of Israele in Donizetti's Marino Faliero. Born in Sichuan Province, China, Mr. Liao studied at the Shanghai Conservatory of Music, where he became a distinguished professor and head of the Vocal Department. In 1997, Liao was a first-prize winner at the Placido Domingo Operalia Competition in Tokyo and the Queen Sonja International Music Competition in Norway. He has also been a first prize winner in the Toulouse French International Vocal Competition. Mr. Liao has performed in concert in England with conductor Colin Davis, and at the Bergen Festival with mezzo-soprano Cecilia Bartoli and violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter. He appeared with José Carreras at the Grand Theatre in Shanghai and with Placido Domingo at a gala New Year's Concert in Japan.

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